Irene Worthington Baron

Astronomy meeting is behind the observatory

 Logo Zanesville Astronomy Club

 

 

 

 

 

ZANESVILLE ASTRONOMY CLUB EVENTS
www.irenebaron.com
 

N E W :  ASTRONOMY CLUB HOTLINE TELEPHONE NUMBER IS: 740-487-3002.
Use this number for meeting updates and/or cancellations. This information line will be in use beginning 1 February.


Gurnsey Co. Public Astronomy Site

Guernsey County Development Corp is developing an astronomy park six miles east of Cambridge, OH. The position of the site is shown in the GOOGLE EARTH image to the left. Things are looking up in Ohio and Guernsey County!

FEBRUARY 2017 EVENTS:

STARGAZING AT THE LEWIS OBSERVATORY is free to the public. Our next scheduled free workshop is Saturday, 11 February in room 409 of the OUZ Campus Center at 5:30 PM. We plan to use the Lewis telescope to observe visible planets, galaxies and other objects of interest beginning at at 6:30 PM. The winter constellations are brilliant and beautiful and will be pointed out to participants. The Moon will be almost full that night.

The February workshop will take place in our assigned place, room 408 in the OUZ Campus Center. Enter the Campus Center at the doorway nearest the Observatory. There will be signs posted inside for you to find room 409.  This hands on workshop is: Introduction: Glass and Mirrors. You will create a "cutaway" telescope.

Some of the demonstrations in this workshop were adapted from materials developed for Hands-On Optics by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in educational collaboration with The International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) and The Optical Society of America (OSA) and sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

Participants owning telescopes are invited to bring them to share with others or learn how to use them. Expect conversation about telescopes and astronomy. Bring curiosity and a smile! Children must be accompanied by an adult during the event.


February Sky Events-the planets:

Venus and Mars will pair up all month in the S-SW skies. See them at dusk in the constellation Pisces. Venus will be at its 2017 brightest the evening of February 17th. It will appear 10X larger than Mars and be about 250X brighter on that date. Faint Uranus at 6th magnitude is visible in SW sky as evening twilight ends. Jupiter, at magnitude -2.2, will rise in E-SE by midnight  early February and two hours earlier by the end of the month. On a7 February Jupiter will be at aphelion, its furthest point (508-million miles) from the Sun. Saturn rises from E-SE horizon 2-hours before sunrise on 1 February. Mercury is seen the first three weeks very low in S-SE skies an hour before sunrise. Use binoculars to spot it during the glow of dawn.

On the mornings of 15-16 February about an hour before sunrise, the Moon is near star Spica.

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse  will occur the evening of Friday, 10 February. The full "Snow Moon" will pass through the Earth's faint outer penumbral shadow and experience only a slight darkening of the upper section.  To see it, look to the eastern horizon at the rising full Moon. 

FREE NASA CD's, POSTERS, PICTURES and LOGO IMAGES ARE USUALLY AVAILABLE FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS AT MEETINGS. They include numerous photographs of Solar System objects. We will be handing out mini-posters of  "Kepler's Planet Candidates" as pictured below. if attending only the Lewis Observatory functions, free pictures, posters and materials will be handed out when you sign in at the Rogge Pavilion.  FREE-POSTERS-ZANESVILLE-ASTRONOMY-CLUB

 DECEMBER-2016-CONSTELLATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Pictures from other meetings are posted at the bottom of the page at: http://www.irenebaron.com/astronomy_paparazzi_photos/  Double click on images to enlarge them.


The Zanesville Astronomy Club helped the United Nations celebrate WORLD SPACE WEEK at our meeting 8 October 2016. World Space Week is held every year 4-10 October 2016. World Space Week (WSW) is an annual holiday set by the United Nations General Assembly. It is annually observed from 4–10 October in various parts of the world, including Europe and Asia. World Space Week is officially defined as "an international celebration of science and technology, and their contribution to the betterment of the human condition."  This is a week of becoming aware of Remote Sensing - Enabling Our Future.  Donors sponsoring this celebration include: Lockheed Martin, Airbus Defense & Space, Astrax, Sanwa Supply, Heinlein Prize Trust and the Space Foundation. Partners include the International Astronautical Federation, Space Generation Advisory Council, Astronomy Without Borders, Universe Awareness, The Planetary Society, SPACEREF and the International Space University. Learn more at: http://www.worldspaceweek.org/

International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) was celebrated at Ohio's only registered location on the evening of 8 October 2016 during our monthly meeting. This annual event has been successfully celebrated in Ohio by our organization. Learn more at: http://observethemoonnight.org/ 

   NASA-Night-Sky-Network-logo

Plans are in the works to open the telescope more often for open viewing beginning about April 2017.


TELESCOPE AVAILABLE FOR MEMBERS:   We have a table top telescope members may borrow. If you have attended three meetings you may use it free for one month. Let Irene Baron or Chuck Bruckelmeyer know during one of our meetings if you are interested. Plan ahead for spring and summer viewing. Using it is great fun for all the family and friends.

NASA NIGHT SKY NETWORK:   Since we are an affiliate of the NASA Night Sky Network, you will become a member of that organization when you join our club.  The email message you receive for the monthly meeting update will be through the NASA Night Sky Network. You may opt out at any time.



HIGHLIGHTS OF SELECTED PAST MEETINGS

June meeting: Two participants brought reflecting telescopes to share. We compared views through three telescopes of the Moon, Saturn, Jupiter and Mars. The Moon photo was taken by Irene through the Lewis Telescope using an iPhone4.

Chuck-at-Lewis-Telescope   John's-new-telescope  Image-w/iPhone4-on-eyepiece

 Workshop: Identifying Conditions for Habitable Exoplanets - 9 January 2016
The Planet Hunting Workshop participants learned about citizen science, exoplanet detection methods, and learned how to determine whether an exoplanet can support life as we know it. 

Exoplanet-workshop-bookletThe materials for this first of many informative workshops about exoplanets were produced by the Adler Planetarium under a grant from NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The materials used during this workshop were supplied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

 

 

 

 

 

Boy-Scout-Astronomy-Badge-day

 Boy Scout Workshop: In November 2015  there was an all day astronomy workshop conducted for local Boy Scouts wanting to earn their astronomy Badge. They were co-hosts as part of their Astronomy Badge that evening.

 

 

 

 

  

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NASA Speaker Bryan Palaszewski made an evening presentation during the Ohio University Zanesville's "Third Thursday" community event on 15 October 2015 in Elson Hall at 7 pm.  Mr. Palaszewski made a presentation at Zanesville High School earlier that day. This NASA speaker was sponsored by the Zanesville Astronomy Club and Ohio University Zanesville.  MARK YOUR CALENDAR!NASA-SPEAKER-BRYAN-PALASZEWSKI Mr. Bryan Palaszewski has worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field since 1989 and is currently directing research on high performance propellants and atmospheric entry. He currently conducts analyses for the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist investigating nanometer-scale propellant additives for metallized gelled fuels for many space mission applications. He recently led work related to human Mars entry, descent, and landing where supersonic retro-propulsion is planned for the final descent to the planet's surface. He is also investigating the mining of outer planet atmospheres and the challenges and benefits for future ambitious space missions. For 6-years he led many studies of advanced space systems for orbital and interplanetary travel at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA. As the lead propulsion subsystem engineer on the Ocean Topography Experiment for 3-years, he was involved in other flight projects such as the Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the Cassini Mission to Saturn.

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28 September 2015 Total Lunar Eclipse viewing at the Lewis Telescope

The total lunar eclipse was barely visible from Ohio on 27-8 September 2015. Totality lasted over an hour but didn't allow much clear sky for viewing. At OUZ we had less than a minute to see the Moon as a hole in the clouds passed in front of it. Those who showed up passed the time watching the NASA broadcast of the eclipse on electronic devices. There was much discussion by everyone about astronomy, so it was a fun time, even though we couldn't see the main event. Misting rain finally let us know the viewing was over a little after eleven. The Moon during that event is also called a "supermoon," and by the American Indians the "corn Moon" and/or "Harvest Moon."

NASA-image-total-lunar-eclipse

TOTAL-LUNAR-ECLIPSE-SEPT-2015

Workshop September 2015- Telescope Construction presented by Chuck Bruckelmeyer

Participants from Nashport, Dresden, Philo and Zanesville created orbit scale models. They later viewed the Orion Nebula and Comet Lovejoy using the Lewis Telescope.

"Everything you want to know about the planet Jupiter but are afraid to ask" has been presented in addition to other planetary specialty events. An experiment was completed to demonstrate how varying sizes, angles and speeds of the meteorites create different types of formations. The objects impacting the material were dropped, thrown and propelled with a sling shot with immediate effects!

Amateur astronomer Chuck Brucklemeyer presented an informative program discussing how to grind and test a telescope mirror. He brought a mirror blank, a ground mirror, a Foucault tester and a spherometer. He proceeded to demonstrate how they worked. Participants were given the opportunity to use the Foucault tester in determining the accuracy of the ground mirror. He also let participants examine three of the numerous grits used in the grinding process. The 2-hour program was well received by those present. When asked if he would grind his own mirror, John Bowen who is owner of a Dobsonian telescope said, "Not at my age!" :-)

Spherometer-discussion-image

 Finished-telescope-mirror-ground-by-Charles-Bruckelmyer

Foucault-Tester-by-C.Brucklemeyer

  Obervers-Jim-&-John

 During one past meeting after observing Mars, Jupiter and the gibbous Moon, solar spectroscopes, purchased from the Stanford University Solar Laboratory, were handed out to participants. Children at the event successfully made their spectroscopes with the provided materials. Images from the event are included below. 

Several of April participants__________ Eleven-inch-Celestron-new-to-Jim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We were able to see Jupiter's swirling stripes and the four largest moons lined up in a row all on one side of the planet. Surprisingly, inside the observatory dome and out of the wind, the temperature was comfortable, even though outside it was below zero. Since winter skies are crisp and clear, the viewing was great. Irene cleared the sidewalk in front of the door of snow before anyone else arrived. Once Chuck arrived, he zeroed right in on Jupiter.

One of the discussions was the way modern telescopes were purchased with computers. If anything would happen to the computer, the user may not be familiar enough with the sky to find what they are looking for. Chuck had a set of over 100-index cards (3X5")created by another astronomer which gave information about all the Messier objects. The cards were printed with a diagram, location, etc. Chuck said there were several other sets of cards available for other objects. If an amateur astronomer had such cards, they would be able to locate objects in the sky easily when their telescope computer stopped working. He will discuss this issue of sky familiarization at a later meeting.

Below are included smartphone photos of the newly shoveled snow at the Lewis Observatory near sunset, and Chuck and John viewing Jupiter.

Lewis Observatory February 2014

Chuck viewing Jupiter

We are exploring options for an indoor meeting site during inclement weather since the university is locked and closed to our club on weekends. There may be an easy to find indoor site available to us. We will know once the Trustees of the site meet and hopefully approve of our using their facility. Keep your fingers crossed! :-)  

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Winter meeting 14 December the university Subway Restaurant graciously let us meet and eat at their facility since the weather had deteriorated. Unfortunately, we're not allowed to meet inside the university as they are closed to weekend events. We had the Chandra X-Ray Observatory posters to distribute to participating members. Chuck Bruckelmeyer had his new telescope out for the first time. The telescope base was recently completed. What was impressive was his beautiful hand ground mirror. He stated he has mirror blanks to give away if anyone would like to try their hand at grinding a telescope mirror. See more photos at the Paparazzi link. Check out the group photo in the Paparazzi link!

The NASA Chandra X-Ray Observatory posters were absolutely beautiful. They were sincerely appreciated by everyone. Thank you NASA! 

Chuck describes his telescope construction Karen & Irene examine new telescope

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examining Chandra X-Ray images John & Jim examine new star chart

Please share your best images with the club. If digital, email them to: irenebaron@irenebaron.com.

Anyone wishing to join the Zanesville Astronomy Club and be included on our alert list or receive our bimonthly newsletter are asked to please email: irenebaron@irenebaron.com with your request. Include your name, address or email address and telephone number.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Zanesville Astronomy Club is an affiliate member of the NASA Night Sky Network!  

The Night Sky Network is associated with NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation and the Astronomy Society of the Pacific. The Network provides information to the public such as local/state/national events, astronomy activities for ages pre-school through adult, videos, games and other astronomy resources.

The mission of the Zanesville Astronomy Club is to provide public outreach about astronomy. Monthly meetings are held at the Lewis Observatory located adjacent to the Rogge Pavilion on the Ohio University-Zanesville campus in Zanesville, Ohio.  The 17-inch Newtonian reflector telescope in the observatory is used for celestial observations. Club organizers Chuck Bruckelmeyer and Irene Baron invite community members of all ages to enjoy viewing the galaxies, stars, the Moon and planets. Baron said, “To have such a large telescope available for the community provides a unique resource for families and amateur astronomers. I would hope citizens will continue to take advantage of the free observational opportunities available.” Baron said she is available to open the observatory for school classes, scout troops and community/service organizations. She is also available as a public speaker to discuss past and current astronomy events, reminding that Comet ISON is arriving this winter.

 The URL addressfor the Night Sky site access is: http://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/.  Information about the local organization may also be found through the Zanesville Astronomy Club Facebook page and web site.

Individuals, schools districts, teachers and community organizations wishing to receive the monthly electronic Zanesville Astronomy Club newsletter are asked to send an email request to: irenebaron@irenebaron.com.

Citizens are reminded they may take advantage of computers at the public libraries in gaining gain access to all club and affiliated electronic astronomy sites

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Zanesville Astronomy Club Event Calendar from the Night Sky Network.
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